Private Schools In Hawaii: Grades PreK-12

NOTE: If you’re interested in finding a private school for a child age 15 months-6 years, I recommend also reading my post Preschools In Hawaii. In 2009, average test scores in reading, math, and science for 4th- and 8th-grade students enrolled in Hawaii’s public schools were all below the national average. Because of their dissatisfaction with the quality of education in the state’s public schools, many parents in Hawaii choose

Public Schools In Hawaii: Grades PreK-12

Hawaii is the only state in U.S. that has just one school district (Department of Education) that governs all public schools in the state. Hawaii’s Department of Education also sets policies such as high school graduation requirements and curriculum standards. For administrative purposes, the Department of Education is divided into 7 subdistricts: Hawaii District (Big Island) Kauai District (Kauai) Maui District (Maui, Molokai, Lanai) Honolulu District (Oahu) Central District (Oahu)

Special-Needs Schools & Programs In Hawaii

If you have a child with with special needs, there are some schools and educational programs in Hawaii that you should know about for children with disabilities, emotional/behavioral problems, and specific learning needs. Some of these schools and programs are run by private organizations and charge tuition. Others are funded through various state and nonprofit agencies, and  require a referral to attend. If you think your child could benefit from

Homeschooling In Hawaii

Parents in Hawaii choose to homeschool their children for a variety of reasons: religious beliefs, dissatisfaction with the quality of public education, having a child with special learning needs, etc. And homeschooling seems to produce good results: According to the National Home Education Research Institute, homeschooled students score 15-30 percentile points higher than public-school students on standardized tests. According to Honolulu Magazine’s 2009 article “Meet the Homeschoolers,” there are around

Colleges, Universities & Vocational Schools In Hawaii

When it comes to post-secondary education in Hawaii, there are surprisingly many options for a relatively small U.S. state. Public post-secondary schools include the Hawaii Department of Education adult community schools and the state’s expansive University of Hawaii system. There are also several private colleges and universities to choose from, as well as vocational schools for those students who want to work in certain trades. To meet representatives from many

Learn English In Hawaii

Hawaii (and in particular, Honolulu) is teeming with English-language instruction schools. Many (but not all) cater to foreign nationals who want to live in Hawaii on an F-1 student visa, and thus offer programs that meet federal visa requirements. (If you’re seeking a student visa, make sure the school you choose is SEVIS-approved and the program includes at least 18 hours of instruction per week.) But not all students who

Getting a Hawaii Drivers License Or State ID

If you have an unexpired drivers license from another U.S. state, Canada, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, or the Northern Mariana Islands: You may continue to use that license to drive in Hawaii, as long as you are at least 18 years old. If you are under age 18, you must apply for a Hawaii license as a new applicant. If you have a drivers license

Hawaii Rental Home Listings: My Top 5 Sites

So you’ve figured out the maximum rent you can afford in Hawaii, and you’ve identified which towns or neighborhoods you’re most interested in moving to. At last, you’re ready to tackle those rental listings to find your new home in Hawaii. Even if you’re not quite ready to move just yet, you should start a habit of checking listings at least once a week. Browsing listings regularly will give you

8 Things Hawaii Landlords Might Not Tell You

When you’re looking for a rental home in Hawaii, you’ll probably have lots of questions for landlords when you inquire about their available properties: What’s the square footage? How many bathrooms? Does it have air-conditioning? Do you allow pets? Are utilities included? Is there a yard? These are all great questions, and I encourage you to take an active role in gleaning information from prospective landlords. There are a few

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 1: Prohibited Animals

Hawaii is a rabies-free state and wants to remain that way. If you’re moving to Hawaii with pets, this means you’re going to have to take several steps to prepare them for entrance into the state. If you arrive in Hawaii without the necessary documentation proving your pets don’t have rabies, they will be quarantined for up to four months, at your expense. Harsh? Yes. But if you carefully read

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 2: Vaccinations

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Rabies Vaccinations For Dogs & Cats For the rest of this series on “Bringing Pets To Hawaii,” I am going to assume your pets are dogs or cats, as that is the case for most people moving to Hawaii with animals. If your pet is another kind of animal, please refer to these requirements on the Department of Agriculture’s website: Birds and poultry Turtles

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 3: Microchip

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip NOTE: If your dog or cat will be coming to Hawaii from Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Isle of Man, Bailiwick of Jersey, and Bailiwick of Guernsey), you can skip this step completely. (Here is a complete list of other requirements for cats and dogs coming from those countries.

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 4: Blood Test

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: OIE-FAVN Blood Test NOTE: If your dog or cat will be coming to Hawaii from Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Isle of Man, Bailiwick of Jersey, and Bailiwick of Guernsey), you can skip this step completely. (Here is a complete list of other requirements for cats and

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 5: Flight Booking

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Unless your pet is a guide dog or service dog, it will probably have to travel to Hawaii in the baggage compartment or cargo hold of an airplane. I have yet to find a commercial airline that allows pets to fly in the passenger cabin on flights to Hawaii. Alaska Airlines is

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 6: Kennel

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Once you’ve booked your pet’s flight(s) to Hawaii and know which airline(s) you’ll be using, visit the airline’s website and read their rules regarding pet kennels (the “crate” or “carrier” that your pet will be secured inside of during its flight). If your journey will consist of more than

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 7: Import Form

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Step 7: Import Form NOTE: If your dog or cat will be coming to Hawaii from Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles, you can skip this step completely. (Here is a complete list of other requirements for cats and dogs coming from those countries. If your pet

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 8: Health Certificate

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Step 7: Import Form Step 8: Health Certificate Pets From Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles If your dog or cat will be coming to Hawaii from Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles, it will need a health certificate issued within 14 days of your

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 9: Flight Prep

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Step 7: Import Form Step 8: Health Certificate Step 9: Flight Prep At least 7 days before your pet’s arrival in Hawaii… – Call the airline(s) to confirm your pet’s reservation(s). – Look up your pet’s microchip number in one of these two universal databases to make sure your

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 10: Moving Day

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Step 7: Import Form Step 8: Health Certificate Step 9: Flight Prep Step 10: Moving Day The day has finally arrived for your pet to fly to its new home in Hawaii! At this point, all the prep work is over, so this post will simply guide you through

Before You Move To Hawaii, Answer These Questions

If living in Hawaii is currently your dream rather than your reality, you’re certainly not alone. And if your dream is anything like mine was, it includes year-round sunshine, going to the beach after work, living in shorts and flip-flops, tropical flowers blooming everywhere, bronze-skinned surfers, a stress-free life… And while that is a somewhat accurate portrayal of real life in Hawaii (I wouldn’t call life here completely stress-free), there

35 Hawaiian Words Every New Resident Should Know

Thanks to Hawaii’s long history of immigration and ethnic diversity, its residents speak a unique form of English. You’ll hear words borrowed from Japanese, Chinese, Portuguese, and other languages. But the most prevalent non-English words you’ll hear are from the Hawaiian language, which is one of state’s two official languages (English is the other). Adding to the unique flavor of Hawaii’s English is the widespread use of pidgin (Hawaii creole)

Feeling Like You’re On Vacation…At Home

Freelance writer Jill Robinson just wrote a post for Vagabonding’s travel blog (thanks for the link, Jill!) titled “Loving Where You Live,” which offers another reason for moving to Hawaii that I hadn’t really thought much about before: to feel like you’re on vacation while you save up your money to go on a “real” vacation. As Jill points out, if you’re someone with a serious case of wanderlust who

Try Living In Hawaii For A Week

So you’ve already thought carefully about the impact a move to Hawaii would have on your family, and you’re OK with any sacrifices you’ll have to make. And you’ve done some research on the different Hawaiian Islands and narrowed it down to one or two that you think would best suit you and your family. You can’t wait to pack everything up and move to paradise. But before you spend

30 More Hawaiian Words Every New Resident Should Know

When I wrote “35 Hawaiian Words Every New Resident Should Know” a couple months ago, I came up with so many words that I had to leave some out to keep the list to a readable length. It’s been a while since I wrote that post, so I figured you’re probably due for another dose of Hawaiian vocabulary. Here are 30 more that you’re likely to encounter as a new

Which Hawaiian Island Should You Move To?

(Note: If this article looks familiar, it’s because it was originally published in my newsletter. I have since changed the format of my newsletter and have moved all articles previously published under the old format to my blog, where they can be more easily found.) Deciding on which of the six major islands in Hawaii to call home is a nice problem to have. They are all beautiful and have

Choosing A Neighborhood In Hawaii

(Note: If this article looks familiar, it’s because it was originally published in my newsletter. I have since changed the format of my newsletter and have moved all articles previously published under the old format to my blog, where they can be more easily found.) Honestly, I don’t know how I would have moved to Hawaii without the Internet. Certainly with more difficulty! I found my rental home, changed my

30 Reasons Why You Might Not Like Living In Hawaii

Today I’m going to be Negative Nelly and give you some food for thought on why you might not enjoy living in Hawaii. Read each statement below and ask yourself, “Is this true for me?” If it is, that doesn’t automatically mean you’ll dislike living in Hawaii. But it does point out something that you need to consider carefully in deciding whether or not to move to Hawaii. For example,

Why You Should Move To Hawaii, Pt. 1

A couple days ago, I was Negative Nelly, listing reasons why you might not like living in Hawaii. Today, I’m happy to report that I am now Positive Pollyanna, here to tell you why you should live in Hawaii. Because despite the challenges of living in Hawaii — high cost of living, limited job opportunities, etc. — there are good reasons why some people choose to move here, and why

Why You Should Move To Hawaii, Pt. 2

Yesterday I started a list of reasons why Hawaii is a great place to live. Today’s post is the second half of that list… Cultural diversity Hawaii is one of the most culturally diverse states in the U.S., and has been for a long time. Besides the tourists who visit from all over the world, the immigrants who are currently moving to Hawaii come from a wide variety of countries,

Women: Dress For Success In Hawaii

Today I had an interview with the APEC hosting committee, to work as a volunteer at the upcoming APEC  summit in Honolulu. It was an easy interview and lasted only about 5 minutes, but I spent hours preparing for it. No, I wasn’t researching what APEC is all about and memorizing its 21 member-countries. Believe it or not, I was trying to figure out … what to wear. Business casual?