Another Real-Life Story Of Moving To Hawaii

I recently discovered another blog about moving to Hawaii that I want to share with you. This one is written by John Derrick, who fell in love with Hawaii 10 years ago when he visited the state for the first time. He and his wife Victoria are finally making their dream come true next year, when they move from South Carolina to Kauai. John is a great writer and storyteller,

Upcoming Job Fair: JobQuest 2011

If you missed yesterday’s WorkForce 2011 job fair in Honolulu, have no fear. There’s another big job fair coming in September — JobQuest 2011: Date: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 Time: 10am-3pm (on-site ticket box office opens at 9:30am) Place: Exhibition Hall at Neal Blaisdell Center, Honolulu Cost: $3 for general admission; $1 for students, seniors 55+, and military personnel with a valid ID. On-site ticket box office opens at 9:30am

Islands, Cities, Districts, and Neighborhoods In Hawaii

Before you start looking for a home in Hawaii, it’s helpful to know which areas of the state you’re most interested in. Which islands have the right mix of natural beauty and modern amenities that you’re looking for? Which cities and towns offer the job, educational, or recreational opportunities you seek? And within those cities, which districts or neighborhoods embody the kind of lifestyle you want to have in Hawaii?

Foreign Nationals: How You Can Live In Hawaii, Too

(Note: If this article looks familiar, it’s because it was originally published in my newsletter. I have since changed the format of my newsletter and have moved all articles previously published under the old format to my blog, where they can be more easily found.) Surprise, surprise: Americans citizens aren’t the only ones who want to move to Hawaii. During fiscal year 2009, nearly 7,000 green-card holders took up residency

Most Affordable Neighborhoods In Hawaii, Pt. 1: Oahu

Everyone knows that housing in Hawaii is expensive. In fact, when compared to other U.S. states, Hawaii’s average rent is the highest. But rents vary greatly throughout the state, depending on the island, city/town, and neighborhood. So which areas of Hawaii have the least expensive rents? And perhaps more importantly, why are they less expensive than other areas? To find out, I used Aloha Living’s Neighborhood Navigator tool to compare

Most Affordable Neighborhoods In Hawaii, Pt. 2: Big Island

Yesterday I wrote about which neighborhoods had the least expensive rental housing on the island of Oahu. Today, let’s take a look at the cheapest ZIP codes on the Big Island. Pahoa (Puna District, on windward coast) ZIP Code: 96778 2-bedroom: $1020 4- bedroom: $1576 Why it’s less expensive: Rainier, less sunny than leeward (Kona) coast. Lava flow hazard zone 2. Why you should still consider it: Lush, tropical setting.

Most Affordable Neighborhoods In Hawaii, Pt. 3: Maui & Molokai

In my last two posts, I wrote about which neighborhoods on Oahu and the Big Island have the least expensive rental housing. Today, Maui County is the focus of my search for the areas with the lowest Fair Market Rents. The towns listed below are on the islands of Maui and Molokai. Although the island of Lanai is also part of Maui County, it’s not included in the list because

Most Affordable Neighborhoods In Hawaii, Pt. 4: Kauai

In my last three posts, I identified which neighborhoods had the cheapest rental housing on Oahu, the Big Island, and Maui & Molokai. Today’s post completes my series on the most affordable ZIP codes in Hawaii, with a focus on the island of Kauai. Kaumakani (West Side of Kauai) ZIP Code: 96747 2-bedroom: $1207 4- bedroom: $1649 Why it’s less expensive: Few amenities, mainly sugar plantations. Commute traffic to/from Lihue

Moving To Hawaii: One Man’s 5-Year Plan

I recently found out about a YouTube Channel called Hawaii Four-0, which is documenting (on video) one man’s progress toward his goal to live in Hawaii for a year with his family by the time he turns 40 (he’s 35 now). Jay’s dream of living in Hawaii is complicated by the fact that he’s not a U.S. citizen — he’s Canadian, from Toronto. But he’s not letting that stop him.

Shipping Cars To Hawaii

If you’re planning a move to Hawaii, you might wonder if it’s worth shipping your current car, motorcycle, or boat overseas, or if you should get rid of it and replace it once you’re living in Hawaii. The answer depends on several factors: Where would you be shipping your vehicle from? If you live on the West Coast of the U.S. mainland: It costs a little over $1,000 to ship

Registering Cars In Hawaii

How you register a vehicle in Hawaii depends on whether you ship it from out of state, buy it new from a Hawaii dealership, or buy it used from someone in Hawaii. If you ship your vehicle to Hawaii… If you buy a new vehicle in Hawaii… If you buy a used vehicle in Hawaii… If you ship your vehicle to Hawaii… …you must get it registered within 30 days

Shipping Household Items To Hawaii

The moving process is never easy, but moving all your stuff to Hawaii is particularly challenging in that it requires not only land transport, but also ocean or air transport to get across that big, beautiful Pacific. Approaches to the Moving Process There are several approaches that you can take when moving your household items to Hawaii: Sell, donate, or store most of your household items. Then all you have

Getting a Hawaii Drivers License Or State ID

If you have an unexpired drivers license from another U.S. state, Canada, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, or the Northern Mariana Islands: You may continue to use that license to drive in Hawaii, as long as you are at least 18 years old. If you are under age 18, you must apply for a Hawaii license as a new applicant. If you have a drivers license

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 1: Prohibited Animals

Hawaii is a rabies-free state and wants to remain that way. If you’re moving to Hawaii with pets, this means you’re going to have to take several steps to prepare them for entrance into the state. If you arrive in Hawaii without the necessary documentation proving your pets don’t have rabies, they will be quarantined for up to four months, at your expense. Harsh? Yes. But if you carefully read

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 2: Vaccinations

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Rabies Vaccinations For Dogs & Cats For the rest of this series on “Bringing Pets To Hawaii,” I am going to assume your pets are dogs or cats, as that is the case for most people moving to Hawaii with animals. If your pet is another kind of animal, please refer to these requirements on the Department of Agriculture’s website: Birds and poultry Turtles

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 3: Microchip

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip NOTE: If your dog or cat will be coming to Hawaii from Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Isle of Man, Bailiwick of Jersey, and Bailiwick of Guernsey), you can skip this step completely. (Here is a complete list of other requirements for cats and dogs coming from those countries.

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 4: Blood Test

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: OIE-FAVN Blood Test NOTE: If your dog or cat will be coming to Hawaii from Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Isle of Man, Bailiwick of Jersey, and Bailiwick of Guernsey), you can skip this step completely. (Here is a complete list of other requirements for cats and

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 5: Flight Booking

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Unless your pet is a guide dog or service dog, it will probably have to travel to Hawaii in the baggage compartment or cargo hold of an airplane. I have yet to find a commercial airline that allows pets to fly in the passenger cabin on flights to Hawaii. Alaska Airlines is

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 6: Kennel

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Once you’ve booked your pet’s flight(s) to Hawaii and know which airline(s) you’ll be using, visit the airline’s website and read their rules regarding pet kennels (the “crate” or “carrier” that your pet will be secured inside of during its flight). If your journey will consist of more than

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 7: Import Form

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Step 7: Import Form NOTE: If your dog or cat will be coming to Hawaii from Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles, you can skip this step completely. (Here is a complete list of other requirements for cats and dogs coming from those countries. If your pet

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 8: Health Certificate

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Step 7: Import Form Step 8: Health Certificate Pets From Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles If your dog or cat will be coming to Hawaii from Guam, Australia, New Zealand, or the British Isles, it will need a health certificate issued within 14 days of your

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 9: Flight Prep

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Step 7: Import Form Step 8: Health Certificate Step 9: Flight Prep At least 7 days before your pet’s arrival in Hawaii… – Call the airline(s) to confirm your pet’s reservation(s). – Look up your pet’s microchip number in one of these two universal databases to make sure your

Bringing Pets To Hawaii, Step 10: Moving Day

Step 1: Prohibited Animals Step 2: Vaccinations Step 3: Microchip Step 4: Blood Test Step 5: Flight Booking Step 6: Kennel Step 7: Import Form Step 8: Health Certificate Step 9: Flight Prep Step 10: Moving Day The day has finally arrived for your pet to fly to its new home in Hawaii! At this point, all the prep work is over, so this post will simply guide you through

Before You Move To Hawaii, Answer These Questions

If living in Hawaii is currently your dream rather than your reality, you’re certainly not alone. And if your dream is anything like mine was, it includes year-round sunshine, going to the beach after work, living in shorts and flip-flops, tropical flowers blooming everywhere, bronze-skinned surfers, a stress-free life… And while that is a somewhat accurate portrayal of real life in Hawaii (I wouldn’t call life here completely stress-free), there

Try Living In Hawaii For A Week

So you’ve already thought carefully about the impact a move to Hawaii would have on your family, and you’re OK with any sacrifices you’ll have to make. And you’ve done some research on the different Hawaiian Islands and narrowed it down to one or two that you think would best suit you and your family. You can’t wait to pack everything up and move to paradise. But before you spend

Which Hawaiian Island Should You Move To?

(Note: If this article looks familiar, it’s because it was originally published in my newsletter. I have since changed the format of my newsletter and have moved all articles previously published under the old format to my blog, where they can be more easily found.) Deciding on which of the six major islands in Hawaii to call home is a nice problem to have. They are all beautiful and have

Choosing A Neighborhood In Hawaii

(Note: If this article looks familiar, it’s because it was originally published in my newsletter. I have since changed the format of my newsletter and have moved all articles previously published under the old format to my blog, where they can be more easily found.) Honestly, I don’t know how I would have moved to Hawaii without the Internet. Certainly with more difficulty! I found my rental home, changed my

30 Reasons Why You Might Not Like Living In Hawaii

Today I’m going to be Negative Nelly and give you some food for thought on why you might not enjoy living in Hawaii. Read each statement below and ask yourself, “Is this true for me?” If it is, that doesn’t automatically mean you’ll dislike living in Hawaii. But it does point out something that you need to consider carefully in deciding whether or not to move to Hawaii. For example,

Why You Should Move To Hawaii, Pt. 1

A couple days ago, I was Negative Nelly, listing reasons why you might not like living in Hawaii. Today, I’m happy to report that I am now Positive Pollyanna, here to tell you why you should live in Hawaii. Because despite the challenges of living in Hawaii — high cost of living, limited job opportunities, etc. — there are good reasons why some people choose to move here, and why

Why You Should Move To Hawaii, Pt. 2

Yesterday I started a list of reasons why Hawaii is a great place to live. Today’s post is the second half of that list… Cultural diversity Hawaii is one of the most culturally diverse states in the U.S., and has been for a long time. Besides the tourists who visit from all over the world, the immigrants who are currently moving to Hawaii come from a wide variety of countries,